Myasthenia gravis is an autoimmune neuromuscular disease leading to fluctuating muscle weakness and fatigability. It is an autoimmune disorder, in which weakness is caused by circulating antibodies that inhibit the excitatory effects of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine on neuromuscular junctions. Muscular fatigue is often seen and MG is associated with ocular problems, and speech, swallowing, and breathing can be affected. Myasthenia Gravis is treated medically with acetylcholinesterase inhibitors or immunosuppressants, and in selected cases, thymectomy. MG is associated with other auto-immune conditions, including thyroid disease, lupus, and diabetes. Animal model studies are ongoing and, according to the Scandinavian Journal of Immunology in 2010, a study demonstrated that hMSC (mesenchymal stem cells) treatment was therapeutically useful in autoimmune myasthenia gravis mice, and the underlying mechanism may relate with their immunomodulatory potential.